White-Tailed Deer, Their Foods and Management in the Cross Timbers

White-Tailed Deer, Their Foods and Management in the Cross Timbers (Texas),
Kenneth L. Gee, Michael D. Porter, Steve Demarais and Fred C. Bryant
A Noble Foundation Agricultural Division publication, NF-WF-11-02, 2011 (3rd Edition)

While deer were present in the Cross Timbers historically, man’s manipulation of much of the Cross Timbers habitat probably has improved its quality and suitability as white-tailed deer habitat in many ways. Since the late 1800s, land use practices and, consequently, the landscape in the Cross Timbers have changed dramatically. In many situations, the net result has been an increase in habitat diversity. The suppression of naturally occurring wildfires, the erection of fences and the prevailing livestock grazing practices have enabled woody vegetation to encroach into many open areas. On the other hand, many wooded areas have been cleared for planting crops and/or pasture. These types of land use practices have created many openings and woody patches of various sizes and in various stages of succession or regrowth. Additionally, numerous plant species have been introduced and have readily naturalized in the region, adding to the vegetational diversity. All in all, many of the landscape changes have been favorable to deer.